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 YOU ARE HERE:
 TESTIMONIALS > Multiple Uses For Ttouch In The Shelter & At Home
   Testimonial:
  MULTIPLE USES FOR TTOUCH IN THE SHELTER & AT HOME
Testimonial By: Libby        Publish Date: 2002-12-01

TTouch for Wetnose Dogs Workshop

Dear Eugenie
Once again many thanks for an enlightening and entertaining day spent with you and your team and the Wet Nose dogs. I learnt a lot and have applied some of your methods and seen with amazement, how well they work!
Herewith some feedback

I have a Cocker Spaniel who hurt his neck. The vet diagnosed a pinched nerve and prescribed some anti-inflammatory pills. That evening the little dog was still very uncomfortable and kept whining and rolling around on the carpet. It was distressing to witness. However five minutes after applying a body wrap he was in his basket, sound asleep!

My Belgium Shepherd is highly excitable and tends to ’forget’ all his training when exposed to new and exciting situations. I have found the method of walking him with the lead around the chest invaluable. Not only does it calm him and keep him close to me, but it also seems to give him stability and confidence. He is still very alert and aware, but without that silly ’madness’ that seems to make him loose concentration and control.

Scooby, an abused Wet Nose dog, is a powerful Ridgeback cross. Although very lovable he can be a handful and only a few of us work with him. Last week when I took him out for his walk I had great difficulty in holding him and in keeping myself upright as it had been raining the ground was slippery. In desperation I took him back to his kennel and worked on him using some of the Ttouch touches. Then when I took him out again, while he was still keen and eager to explore and sniff, he was calm enough for us both to enjoy our walk without being run away with.

A very frightened and abused young dog arrived in the Kennels. He growled menacingly at anyone who came into or near his cage and sat in the corner trembling and urinating. I saw him the next day and went in and just sat with him without touching him. I tried the techniques you taught us of avoiding eye contact, yawning and smacking my lips whilst feeding him little bits of liver bread [which, by the way, my dogs will sell their souls for]. Slowly he came and allowed me to pat him, put the chain on and within a short while we were outside enjoying the sunshine - and he had decided that this wasn’t such a bad place after all!

So many thanks, Eugenie, you are doing a great job educating us all and improving the quality of life of our dogs.
Best wishes
Libby

© 2006 TTouch - eugenie@ttouch.co.za.   All Rights Reserved.
 

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