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 YOU ARE HERE:
 TESTIMONIALS > The Story Of Trixie, Who Died After Being Left In The Car In The Summer Heat
 
   Testimonial:
  THE STORY OF TRIXIE, WHO DIED AFTER BEING LEFT IN THE CAR IN THE SUMMER HEAT

Letter from Doreen Stapelberg – Trixie – Watch for the summer’s heat!

I received a call from one of my clients at 5:15pm one afternoon, to tell me that her neighbor’s little Foxy, Trixie, had inadvertently been shut into a car for some hours during that afternoon, after a short ride to town. It was a blazing hot day. On discovering her, [ unconscious ] they had put her into cold
water, and then taken her to the vet, where they were told that the prognosis was extremely poor. Even if she lived, which was very doubtful, she would, in all probability, be severely brain damaged.

 Could I do anything?  I rushed to the vets. to find what looked like an already dead dog, lying in one of the cages. She was icy cold, still damp, and I had to put my ear on her mouth to detect the tiniest sign of breathing, which was coming in small, almost inaudible gasps. Her tongue hung out of the side of her mouth, as dry as a bone. A drip ran into a front leg.

I began doing ear slides, and circles around the base of her ears, interspersed with quick, vigorous runs down her body, to try to warm it and get it dry, at least. After about 30 minutes, one eyebrow began to twitch. I started to talk to her then, mentioning her name often, holding her face in my hands, close up to mine. She was trying to open her eyes!

Shortly thereafter, her family arrived. I asked them to rub her dry, and do circles all over her body, and talk, talk, talk to her. Trixie was making a huge effort to respond. She managed to open her eyes, one at a time, briefly, and pulled her tongue back into her mouth. We turned her over and worked her other side, and all the time she was fighting to come back to consciousness. It seemed that every time she heard her name called, her eyes flickered; and then she opened them, and looked into the eyes of her anxious family. She knew they were there, touching her and loving her. And that was all she needed. She had made her last supreme effort. Her family had been able to let her know that they cared. Trixie’s blood vessels had collapsed from the extreme heat her little body had been subjected to in the car. Not veterinary science, or TTouch could do any more. Trixie slipped quietly away.

Summer is nearly upon us. Please, animal lovers, do not take your pets to town, and just slip into the store to get something. You never know how long you’ll be gone for, and a few minutes can mean the difference between life and death to an animal. It is not cruel to leave them at home for a few hours. It is very cruel to lose a beloved pet in this manner.

© 2006 TTouch - eugenie@ttouch.co.za.   All Rights Reserved.
 

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