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  Newsletter:
  FEBRUARY 2010, TELLINGTON TTOUCH NEWSLETTER
1.   EUGENIE'S LETTER
2.   PRACTITIONER TRAINING
3.   HORSE WORKSHOPS - 5-DAY TTEAM WITH SARAH FISHER: APRIL 2010
4.   TTOUCH DOG/CAT WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES
5.   TTOUCH TIPS - TTOUCH FOR PERFORMANCE DOGS
6.   CLICKER TIPS - CAN A PUNISHER ALSO BE A REINFORCER?
7.   CLICKER CLASSES
8.   PUPPIES - THE KEY TO KIBBLE – TRAINING FROM THE COUCH!
9.   PUPPY SOCIALIZATION CLASSES
10.   HEALTH - WHY DO CATS BITE THE HAND THAT PETS THEM?
11.   HEALTH - HOW HOT DO CARS GET?
12.   SHANTI & FRIENDS UPDATE: HARLEY, THE HERO
13.   YOUR LETTERS
14.   ODDS AND ENDS
15.   EVENTS
16.   DOGS & CATS NEEDING HOMES
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1.   EUGENIE'S LETTER

January/February 2010

TELLINGTON TTOUCH NEWSLETTER

(Print and read at your leisure – copyright - Eugenie Chopin

Unless otherwise stated)

www.ttouch.co.za - for more info on any subject!

Hello TTouch Friends!

Wow, what a start to the New Year! Sarah Fisher was here with her gorgeous daughter Daisy, to teach the second Intro to the Companion Animal Practitioner Training Program. We had an amazing workshop with stunning new TTouch students. And for those of you living in the Eastern Cape, I am really hoping that you’ll soon have a Practitioner there!

And speaking of new Practitioners, congratulations are due for Heather Whitfield and Gail Bester! (Centurion & Midrand respectively)

For those of you who are interested in the Practitioner Training for companion Animals, but didn’t manage to make an Intro, we are excited to confirm that there will be 2 Trainings in April, so it will be possible to start the 3-year training program in April. However, let us know ASAP as the one session is already fully booked.

We had some excitement with a break-in during Sarah’s stay, but between the Alarm and Harley, (now known as Harley, the Hero) the culprit didn’t stay long enough to take anything! We are so very protected here and I like to show appreciation to the forces that kept us safe.

After the training we were off to the Kruger for a delicious and “super hot” experience! Hot, being used in the temperature range….. Thanks Chrysler for a very good air-conditioning system! We saw amazing Elephants, Buffalo, Lion, Rhino, Kudu, Hippo, Hyena, Honey Badger, etc. etc. It never ceases to amaze me that each time I’m in the bush, I experience something new. This time it was Rhino wallowing in the mud and scratching, a herd of elephants making lots of excited vocal noise and a ground Hornbill pecking at a car.

The Clicker Class still has space, so for those who are wanting to know more about the clicker training, do let us know ASAP as we start on Feb. 19th.

For those of you wanting to do TTEAM (Equine) trainings, April is already overbooked and October is half full, so get your bookings in ASAP!

And thanks again to the South African Police who sponsored a 6-day TTouch training for their Dog Unit. We always have fun with them, although I do wonder at the Evaluation forms that all said the training should have been longer!

Warmest Regards,

Eugenie Chopin

Certified Tellington TTouch Practitioner, Level 3

eugenie@ttouch.co.za



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
1. The later you are, the more excited your dogs are to see you.



 
2.   PRACTITIONER TRAINING

PRACTITIONER TRAINING FOR COMPANION ANIMALSApril 29-May 4 or April 22-27

TTACT IV is off to a great start!

After a fabulous start to the TACT IV Program, we are excited that we can now offer you 2 trainings in April! This hopefully means that we can accommodate everyone who wants to join the Companion Animal Training. Although you will have missed an Intro, it is still possible to join us as a “newbie” on the April training. A bonus is that Sarah Fisher will be the Instructor. Many of you have see Sarah on DSTV’s Talking to Animals – (National GeoWild).

The training runs over 3 years, with 2-week long sessions per year lasting between 5 & 6 days. (Because of the Second Intro, it’s possible to do 3 sessions in 2010) You do NOT need to have any previous experience to join this training. However, you might like to join a workshop before then if you are keen to start. Having a basic knowledge can help you retain more of the Intro training, but again this is not necessary for you to be part of the TTACT IV class. If you are interested in a workshop, please go to our website at www.ttouch.co.za and have a look at the workshop page.

After the Introductory Session and between sessions, students are encouraged to assist at workshops for further experience and do case studies. The program comprises only 2 sessions a year in order to help students with their finances and the need to get time off work. The workshops are scheduled to include a weekend in order to make it as convenient as possible.

The Program is a comprehensive training of hands on work with Companion Animals such as dogs, cats, rabbits, birds, etc.

WHAT DOES THE TRAINING INCLUDE?

We endeavour to help the student to be proficient and confident in the TTouch work. To this end we have a program that we believe gives a steady, hands-on experience for the best results. That includes such things as:

·        After session 2, the TTouch student is required to do 5 case studies between each session, 15 in total. This is to ensure that the student is doing and experiencing the work as well as getting feedback on what they are doing.

·        After session 2, each student receives a Mentor who is available to help him with these case studies and any question he might have about how to handle a particular situation.

·       At session 2, we begin to take students to a Shelter to work on both cats and dogs. This is to give you an opportunity to experience as many different animals as possible. It also allows us to give back something to the animal community. (Please note that if anyone has an objection to going into the shelter, and we realize that it is hard for some, there is no obligation. There is always an alternative to work with the kennel or your own animals instead.)

·        At session 3, we start to introduce Client Days. This is a morning where we set up Clients and their dogs for you to help in a safe and supported environment.

·        In general, the course is very much a hands on training, giving you a great variety of experience with as many animals as possible, so that at the end of 6 modules you feel confident to handle the clients and cases that come your way.

·       TTACT students are encouraged to assist at workshops given by fully Certified Practitioners. This is a great learning experience and invaluable to the learning process.

·        The TTouch office and Guild is always here to answer any questions or concerns you might have. Please don’t hesitate to call us if you have any needs!

·         Our Instructors all come from overseas and are the best in the world. One of the beauties of this program is that the same people teach it worldwide and so the information doesn’t get filtered down through many hands. The Instructors include Linda Tellington Jones (creator of TTouch), Robyn Hood (Linda’s sister and brilliant teacher), Edie Jane Eaton (also a Feldenkrais Practitioner) & Debby Potts (teacher par excellence).

·         This program is about helping you communicate with animals, giving people an alternative method of working with both animals and people, our human relationship with the animal world and giving you the tools to do all of these things. The program is dynamic, creative and yet very practical so that the work is clear and easy to understand.

At the end of 2 years, if you have done your case studies, you will acquire the Status of Practitioner–In–Training and are then able to charge for one-on-one consultations with clients.

DATE:            April 22-27 or April 29-May 4, 2010

VENUE:        Broshacarm Kennels - Midrand

COST:            +/- R4200 (Dependant on Rand/Dollar Rate)

Please contact Eugenie if you are interested in more information at eugenie@ttouch.co.za

SESSION 3: October 14-19, 2010



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
2. Dogs don't notice if you call them by another dog's name.
 
3.   HORSE WORKSHOPS - 5-DAY TTEAM WITH SARAH FISHER: APRIL 2010

(Sorry, folks, but this Clinic is sold out. Bookings are however, open for October, so get a place now!)

Come and get a taste of this wonderful work to help your horse be the best he/she can be.

TTeam, a technique developed over the last 30 years, uses TTouch and non-habitual movement to help make the lives of our equine friends a little easier, and to enhance the relationship between horse and owner/rider.

The 5-day Horse Clinic can be used as one of the 4 Clinics necessary to become a Horse Practitioner. (For more information on How To Become A TTEAM Practitioner go to: www.ttouch.co.za. This clinic is suitable for both professionals & novices alike. This 5-day Clinic includes TTEAM philosophy, bodywork, ground exercises, riding and is also a good overall view of the Horse work.

Learning the TTEAM techniques will help each rider increase communication with their horse, identify and relieve areas of bodily soreness or discomfort, and help solve training blocks while enabling the horse to learn with out fear.

A truly inspirational method for influencing behaviour, health and performance, including the following:

  • Increase your horse’s willingness to learn and ability to perform
  • Identify and alleviate soreness without drugs
  • Train your horse safely, with confidence, even if you are inexperienced in handling horses
  • Overcome resistances without fear, pain or force
  • Enhance healing and speed recovery of injury- related problems
  • Learn ground exercises to improve balance and develop coordination

    VENUE

    HORSE

    DATE

    COST

    CONTACT

    Hermanus

    Western Cape

    2 day Horse Incorporating TTouch into your daily routine

                             20-21 March

                          R800

    Catherine quadrisense@gmail.com

    Firlands Gordon’s Bay Western Cape

    2 day Horse Incorporating TTouch into your daily routine

    1-2 May

    R750.00  Incl. Notes

    Catherine quadrisense@gmail.com

    T:  021 790 0792

                         Laezonia

    1 day Horse Incorporating TTouch by Lindy Dekker

    7 March 09:00 to 16:00

                       R350.00

    Elke on 084 593 1938 or position@mailbox.co.za

    Donnybrook Stables Johannesburg

    5 day TTEAM with Sarah Fisher

    16-20 April 2010

                             +/- R4000

    Lindy equibalance@iafrica.com 083 616 0577

    Donnybrook Stables Johannesburg

    5 day TTEAM with Robyn Hood

    22-26 October 2010

                               +/- R4000

    Lindy equibalance@iafrica.com 083 616 0577



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
3. Dogs like it if you leave a lot of things on the floor.
 
4.   TTOUCH DOG/CAT WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

VENUE

DOG

DATE

COST

CONTACT

Pinelands Scout Hall Cape Town

TTouch Understand your dog

11 –12 April 2010

R700

Debbie Conradie Debbie.Conradie@telkomsa.net T:  021 919 1991 or 083 992 8767

5.   TTOUCH TIPS - TTOUCH FOR PERFORMANCE DOGS

by Lisa Walters, Tellington TTouch Practitioner

I hosted a TTouch workshop for a local dog training club’s agility group. There were many "ah ha" moments and favourable responses, but I was most impressed with one particular Border Collie named Thistle. He was brilliant and a super athlete. Thistle was a bullet on the course, screaming fast through every turn. Even though he finished fast, he just could not clear his feet over the jumps and kept knocking them over, every single time. It’s not that he couldn’t get the height, he was simply unaware of where his feet were.

We did some one-second Clouded Leopard TTouches down his back legs to his feet, followed by python lifts and leg circles. Thistle was pretty stiff legged which didn’t surprise me and I didn’t think this alone would help.  I wanted to introduce him to his legs and help him to become mindful of them. We then put velcro leg wraps on his back legs. This is something that at the time I have not widely used, much less had success with, but it was nothing short of amazing. We put the leg wraps on and he walked around, awkwardly at first, but as soon as his person got him focused on the course he was able to walk soundly. She cued Thistle to run the course and on the very first lap, he cleared each and every one of the jumps.

He ran the course three times with success on every run. His person was baffled at how something so simple as two pieces of velcro could make all the difference. I explained to her that what we did was to wake up those neural pathways that weren’t being used but also, while Thistle was cruising through the course at lightning speed, no matter how fast he ran, he could always feel those wraps on this hocks. There was now a mind/body connection constantly reminding him not to forgot about those dangly things back there and to pick them up! After a few practice trials, Thistle no longer needed the wraps and could compete and finally win!

Lisa Walters
Professional Dog Trainer, Behavior Consultant Tellington TTouch Practitioner Member: AABP, APDT, APHE, HSUS
 

superdogtraining@hotmail.com

"Teach your dog one experience at a time and always allow them to teach you something.  Be a benevolent leader."

From Tellington Ttouch E-News Oct. 2009



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
5. Dogs agree that you have to raise your voice to get your point across.
 
6.   CLICKER TIPS - CAN A PUNISHER ALSO BE A REINFORCER?

Dan says that Shutzhund working dogs take stick hits from the target person they are attacking, and come back fighting for more. It seems that they do not see the stick hits as punishment. Some world-class trainers describe these dogs as adrenalin addicts.

The short answer to Dan’s question: don’t equate an aversive stimulus with a punishment. A punishment, technically, is anything that shortens or stops a behavior. If someone hit you or me with a stick, we might do less of whatever we did that triggered an adversary to strike at us; however, a fighter might do more. I shrink at the very thought of swimming in freezing water; Karl jumps in, once a year.

Don’t equate an aversive stimulus with a punishment.

An aversive stimulus is not necessarily punishing, it depends on circumstances and on the recipient. Rain is punishing to cats, who might respond by going inside, reinforcing to ducks, who might respond by going outside, and a matter of indifference to cows, who stay where they are. And circumstances can change one’s view of what’s punishing. We primates generally seek shelter in a downpour, but Gene Kelly, having just fallen in love, famously sang and danced in the rain.

We need to separate the “thing”—the cookie or the stick or the click or the cold water or whatever—from its outcome. What defines its function is not what it looks like to common sense, but how it changes the behaviour. If that stick doesn’t slow the dog down, then no matter how scary it looks to us, it’s not functioning as a punisher.

It’s the same with reinforcers. If the dog won’t take the treat, no matter how delicious it looks to us, then in that situation the treat is not a reinforcer. I see people petting dogs effusively, under the assumption that they are giving the dog pleasure. If you look at the dog, though, it’s showing an eye white or ducking away from the pat or shaking off the unwanted contact. At that moment, with that dog, your effusiveness is definitely not a positive experience.

Technically, a reward or a punisher has no specific definition; it’s just anything we’ve chosen that we think our learner might like or might avoid. Only the individual doing the behaviour can truly tell what sort of “postcedent” or subsequent event any particular item might be.

The behaviours of seeking apparent aversives or avoiding apparent rewards illustrate the often-misunderstood subtleties of B.F. Skinner’s thinking. His vocabulary deals with processes and outcomes, not with specific items or events.

Technically, a reward or a punisher has no specific definition; it’s just anything we’ve chosen that we think our learner might like or might avoid.

Find out more

Want to delve deeper? I recommend a new textbook, Behaviour Analysis for Effective Teaching, by Julie Skinner Vargas. It’s the best explication I’ve ever read of operant conditioning. It goes back to Skinner’s first discoveries. It goes forward to modern training by integrating throughout the text the uses and functions of secondary reinforcers as used in clicker training and TAGteaching (technologies that previous behaviour analysis textbooks either get wrong or ignore). The book is aimed at grade school teachers, but it serves any of us who teach anyone or anything. It is a college textbook—long, complex, expensive—but worth having on your shelf and dipping into often. There’s enlightenment on every page.

Happy clicking

Karen Pryor

With thanks to Karen  - find more interesting articles on www.clickertraining.com

7.   CLICKER CLASSES

2 WEEKENDS – BRAND NEW

Ok, here is it – People have been asking me for years to create a weekend workshop for Clicker, so that people from out-of-town have the possibility to join us or that we might possibly take this class out of town.

We are going to see how 2 weekends work with 3 additional 2-hour sessions for those with dogs.

We will be doing “Learning Theory” sessions on Friday Evenings & a combination of Theory and Practical with dogs on Saturday and Sunday. This class will be open to those who want to bring dogs as well as a limited number of observers.

DATES:   Feb. 19-21 + Feb. 26-28; Plus a possible 3 Saturday mornings thereafter

Without dogs: Friday Evenings: Feb.19 & 26 – 6-9 p.m.
With dogs: Saturdays and Sundays: 10 until 4 p.m. Plus 2-3 extra
Saturday mornings for practical only

VENUE    Sandown– Johannesburg

BOOK:     Eugenie Chopin at eugenie@ttouch.co.za  or phone 011 884 3156 for more info.

COST:      Weekend Class: R1600: this includes the cost of the 2 Weekends, notes, treat bag, target stick and a clicker
R300: 3 extra Saturday mornings for practical application with your dog 
 

March 6, 13 & 20: 9:30 – 12:00 each Sat. morning

If you have always wanted to learn a method of training that doesn’t need aversives to be effective, then join us for a Clicker Experience! Although Operant Conditioning and the Clicker have been around for many years, especially in the Marine World and in training many species of animals for film, it’s only in the last 10 years that it has started to become Mainstream in the Dog Training World. Here is your chance to catch up!

Clicker Training is basically about re-enforcing Behaviour that you want. It works on the principles of giving reward for correct behaviour rather than using corrections and aversives for unwanted behaviour. As a result, you can establish true respect from your dog without fear. It’s fun to do, the dogs love it and therefore gain in confidence and you can finally understand why they do the things they do and how your Behaviour and actions influence them daily!

NOTE: An aversive is anything the dog doesn’t like! So if you yell at your dog and it likes the attention, it might actually be a reward!

This class is designed to teach those who want to truly understand the concepts of Operant Conditioning, how animals learn, how to get through the barriers that stop the learning process and how to move forward in small enough steps to be successful in anything that you want to teach. If you are a Trainer, are interested in being a Trainer, or just are a dog owner who wants to understand more, then this might be the class for you!

or



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
6. You never have to wait for a dog; they're ready to go 24 hours a day.

 
8.   PUPPIES - THE KEY TO KIBBLE – TRAINING FROM THE COUCH!

Folks that have read my books and seen my videos know my sentiments about dog training: If you can’t train your dog while enjoying a cup of tea, reading a book, or watching television, then you’re doing something wrong.

I would regularly train my Malamute Phoenix while watching football (soccer) matches on the television. During the advertisement breaks, I would ask her to leave the couch and sit in her dog bed directly in front of the television. When she sat in her bed, I could barely see the bottom of the screen over the massive dome of her head. It was easy then to lie back on the couch, to take a sip of tea and to read a few pages while keeping just one eye on her solid sit stays. If at anytime, I could see the entire screen, I knew that she was sinking and that it was time to remind her of her Sit Stay.

I remember on one occasion, many years ago, I decided to sharpen up her sit stays and watch a bit of footie on the telly. Just one problem though, I couldn’t find the remote control and the television was tuned to Animal Planet. (It’s usually tuned to Animal Planet — for the dogs). So instead, I thought I would teach Phoenix how to find the remote control. But of course, I couldn’t do this without having the remote control for practice. So instead, I settled on teaching Phoenix how to find my car keys, while watching Pet Line reruns with Dr. Patricia McConnell (on Animal Planet).

I settled down on the couch with a cup of tea and a bowl of kibble (Phoenie’s brunch). Phoenie was going to enjoy individual kibble hors d’oeuvres, learning key Search and Rescue. I tossed my keys on the carpet in the middle of the room and kept an eye on Phoenix, who, for the next five minutes, kept both eyes on me — an imploring, penetrating gaze with thoughttransfer...“ give-me-kibble, give-me-kibble…” (The default setting for most dogs to get what they want is “to sit and look cute .”)

After a while Phoenie gave up and glanced over her shoulder. Immediately, I said, “Gooood girl” and gave her a piece of kibble. She then watched me for a minute or two before looking towards the window...“Good girl” and another piece of kibble. She immediately got up and came closer, so I ignored her. After a short while she got up again and moved away — “Good girl” plus kibble. She has played this game before and quickly caught on to the fact that the key to the kibble did not involve looking at me. This time she got up and put her nose to the carpet—“Goooood girl” plus three pieces of kibble! After similarly rewarding her half a dozen times for sniffing the floor, she was nose vacuuming like a bloodhound on a spoor. I praised and rewarded when she sniffed towards the keys and sure enough, eventually she sniffed the keys—“Goooooooood girl” plus five pieces of kibble.

Phoenix received the next half a dozen or so pieces of kibble for variously sniffing and noseprodding the bunch of keys. Then we thinned out the rewards, looking for some closer caninekey communion. With the paucity of kibble, she became much more demonstrative in her key interactions and after one particularly lengthy reward-delay she eventually, grabbed the keys and tossed them to one side. She received an extremely enthusiastic reward for that response. She had learned that the secret to the game had something to do with the bunch of keys and she was gladly grabbing the keys and tossing them all over the place and getting rewarded handsomely for her efforts.

At this stage of the game, precise timing becomes the sine qua non of successful training. I would start to say “Gooooood girl” the moment she touched the keys, but would abruptly stop praising and drop the kibble back in the bowl the instant she dropped them. After five non-kibble key-tosses in a row, Phoenix stopped tossing the keys but also, she stopped touching them altogether. So, we had to backtrack a bit and I had to wait a couple of minutes to reward her for touching the keys again. And bingo! On the very next attempt, Phoenix picked up the keys and held them in her jaws just a few inches from the floor. “Good girl” plus three pieces of kibble.

From then on it became plain sailing. Phoenix had learned that the keys were the key to canine kibble and would happily pick them up whenever I would throw them down. Now, it was time to add some instructions. I sat on the carpet, said, “Find my keys”, put the keys on the floor and said “Good girl” as she held them and held out my hand to catch the keys as she dropped them. We did this a dozen times for a single piece of kibble each time but with the additional contingency — no kibble if I dropped the keys. In no time at all, she learned to delicately place the keys into my proffered hand.

Then came the fun bit. With Phoenie in a sit stay (in front of the TV), I would place the keys on the floor and then return to sit on the couch. Sure enough, when instructed to “Find my keys” Phoenix would pick them up and come back to drop them in my hand. Over successive trials, I would place the keys further and further away until eventually I was placing them in different rooms. By this time we were getting low on kibble and so I was only rewarding some of her quicker and more enthusiastic finds.

The entire training session comprised just one canine brunch. It involved very little effort on my part and Phoenix loved the game so much that we used to play it quite often, especially after asking her if she would like to drive downtown to buy a dish of frozen yogurt. (Frozen food is obviously a malamute thing.) On one occasion, I hid the keys in a really difficult place (on top of the dining room table — strangely enough, the place I always put my keys) and after hunting high and low for a long time, Phoenix came back to where I was sitting and started rummaging around in the couch and then...she offered me the remote control instead! Seems that it had been under the cushion all that time. What dogs will go through to keep the television tuned to Animal Planet.

©2006 Ian Dunbar With kind permission from Ian and www.DogStarDaily.com



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
7. Dogs find you amusing when you're drunk.

 
9.   PUPPY SOCIALIZATION CLASSES

All classes below are given by TTouch Practitioners or Practitioners in Training and incorporate TTouch in the Handling of puppies.

ő        Brixton / Auckland Park: Puppy classes; contact Candi Moon: on 079 490 3233, urbabies.sanctuary@gmail.com, or        , www.furbabiestraining.co.za

ő        Bryanston, Puppy 1&2, Classes Wednesday evening & Saturday afternoon.
Private sessions on request. Niki Elliott 082 451 0433 or niki@thinkingpets.com

ő        Cape Town; Puppy Socialization Saturday afternoons, call Debbie on
083 992-8767 or email Debbie.conradie@telkomsa.net 

ő        Centurion: Puppy Socialising, Basic Obedience & Clicker Classes, 8-Week Course Weekdays and Weekends.  Heather Whitfield 083 566 7009 or email heather4paws@gmail.com

ő        Durbanville: Puppy Classes for pups under 4 months. Ongoing: new every 6 weeks. Claire Grobbelaar 021 9790848 or 082 784 7524 Claire.g@mweb.co.za

ő        Heidelberg: Jordaanpark, Every Sunday; contact Ilze van der Walt: zafira.ilze@webmail.co.za or         082 921 4448

ő        Hermanus, Gordon’s Bay, Somerset West: Puppy l & ll. Tel 082 490 1650 and e-mail janina@krugerphotography.co.za

ő        Lyndhurst, Gresswold, Bramley, Kew, Waverley Area: Puppy Socialising, 6 Week courses on Sundays. Nicky Lucka 083-408-1517 lucka@absamail.co.za

ő        Parkwood: Puppy Classes, 6 Week courses on Saturday afternoons R480 Tersia Kock 082 828 0505 tkock@telkomsa.net

ő        Pretoria – Lynnwood Glen, Puppy classes for pups until 16 weeks and Basic obedience classes (using clicker training) for dogs 16 weeks and older.  Contact Anelize 079 272 4595 or Manuela 076 427 9166

ő        Randpark Ridge: Puppy Socialising with Clicker, 7 Week courses on Saturday mornings. Wendy Wilson, 083 336 1761 overthemoon@iafrica.com

ő        Sandringham: Puppy Socialising, 6 Week courses on Sundays & Weekday evenings ongoing. Kim Heller 082 570 0463 kimh@kti.co.za



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
8. Dogs like to go hunting and fishing.

 
10.   HEALTH - WHY DO CATS BITE THE HAND THAT PETS THEM?

Recently a friend who is quite knowledgeable about pets and their behaviour said something that gave us pause. She said her cat sometimes bites her when she is petting him to show his dominance over her.

It’s not uncommon for cats to bite or scratch when being petted. Some cats will just get up and leave when they have apparently had enough petting. Others will turn and bite, and it is this behaviourour friend was referring to as being "dominance motivated".

In the traditional thinking about social dominance, threatening or aggressive behaviourusually occurs over some resource such as food, a toy or a place, or when another individual challenges the dominant individual. It’s hard to fit the "don’t pet me anymore" aggression into this framework. There is no resource to be contested, and it’s hard to see how petting is a challenge to the cat’s social status, particularly if the cat solicited the petting to begin with.

This is another example, we think, of people confusing social dominance with control. Perhaps our friend believes that because her cat was trying to control her actions by biting her, she interpreted this as her cat trying to "dominate" her. We’ve explained before that social dominance and having control over an animal are two different things. Animals in a dominant role in a relationship don’t attempt to completely control the behaviors of the subordinates.

Another possible explanation for the "don’t pet me anymore" biting is that sooner or later the petting becomes uncomfortable for the cat. Another hypothesis is that petting results in general arousal causing the cat to bite. Other cats may just be fearful and not enjoy physical contact from people for very long. The bottom line is that we don’t understand this behaviourvery well and no explanation so far seems to adequately explain the behaviourin all its slightly different manifestations.

It seems that people tend to invoke the "dominance explanation" when they don’t understand the "why" of a behavior. Often, their idea of what dominance actually
means is vague and unclear. Frequently we see "dominance" become a catch-all explanation for any sort of inappropriate behavior by the animal.

This is not a good ’fall-back’ explanation because of what it implies. If a cat is supposedly biting because he’s trying to establish his social position over his owner, then what should the owner do in turn? Try to "dominate" the cat? That generally leads to visions of scruffing, pinning, and other uncalled for physical confrontations that are virtually guaranteed to result in fear and more aggression from the cat, injury to the person, a damaged relationship, and a cat that now enjoys being touched even less. Or a less dangerous but more humorous approach borrowed from dog behavior - nothing in life is free - making the cat ’work’ for what he wants. If you aren’t laughing, you should be!

October Newsletter from Animal Behavior Associates by Suzanne Hetts & Daniel Estep. For more info, go to www.animalbehaviorassociates.com

                                                                                                           

  



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
9. A dog will not wake you up at night to ask, "If I died, would you get another dog?"
 
11.   HEALTH - HOW HOT DO CARS GET?

If you were ever wondering about the temperature in your car, below is an article from http://www.mydogiscool.com/ - It clearly shows that a cracked window is not nearly enough to keep your pets cool in the car. Since we’ve had some pretty hot days lately, I thought I’d add this in:

Have you ever noticed how hot it can get inside a car on a summer day — far hotter than it is outside? That’s because a car acts like a greenhouse, trapping the sun’s heat.

A study by the Animal Protection Institute showed that even moderately warm temperatures outside can quickly lead to deadly temperatures inside a closed car.

The study, conducted during a local heat wave, compared an outside temperature of a shaded area with the inside of an automobile in three states: fully closed, with four windows cracked, and with two windows cracked. Inside temperatures were measured with an indoor/outdoor thermometer and an oven thermometer (both readings are given). All temperatures use the Fahrenheit scale.

Day 1

Outside Temperature

Inside Closed Automobile

 

Indoor/Outdoor

Oven Thermometer

9:00 am

82°

109°

----

9:30 am

87°

115°

----

10:00 am

91°

115°

----

10:30 am

94°

114°

115°

11:00 am

98°

114°

119°

11:30 am

100°

117°

124°

12:00 pm

101°

119°

127°

1:30 pm

112°

124°

130°

2:30 pm

125°

130+°

159°

4:00 pm

98°

110°

110°

Day 2

Outside Temperature

Inside Auto - 4 Windows Cracked

 

Indoor/Outdoor

Oven Thermometer

9:15 am

84°

98°

98°

10:00 am

88°

103°

105°

10:30 am

90°

108°

108°

11:00 am

92°

109°

109°

12:00 pm

95°

113°

113°

1:00 pm

101°

114°

115°

2:00 pm

110°

123°

120°

3:40 pm

112°

129°

128°

4:00 pm

115°

132°

130°

Day 3

Outside Temperature

Inside Auto - 2 Windows Cracked

 

Indoor/Outdoor

Oven Thermometer

8:30 am

72°

72°

72°

9:30 am

80°

95°

95°

12:00 pm

88°

105°

105°

1:50 pm

99°

109°

109°

2:30 pm

104°

120°

120°

(both thermometers showed identical readings)   



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
10. If a dog has babies, you can put an ad in the paper and
give them away.

 
12.   SHANTI & FRIENDS UPDATE: HARLEY, THE HERO

It’s always interesting to me how a dog will react in any given situation. So many of us here in South Africa like to have dogs as “protection”, but most of us haven’t trained our dogs this way. I.e. - to attack on command or to search out and corner (or bring down) a suspect.

So what is a “protection dog”? I’m guessing that it’s different things to different people. For myself, I actually want dogs that will alarm bark when something is out of the ordinary such as a person they don’t know or a noise outside that is unfamiliar. Of course, I tend to get barking at everyone who arrives on the property and I’m sure it’s uncomfortable for a few people arriving here, but I have to admit that I don’t overly discourage  “alert barking” at people arriving on the property.

I know that many people keep dogs outside in the hopes of getting early warning or even discouraging intruders during the night. I have to tell you that personally I think it’s a bad idea and for several reasons. The first being that I don’t want my dogs to be hurt or killed by intruders and I know several people who have had dogs either poisoned or drugged by burglars. There are very few dogs when presented with a piece of meat and no one watching, that won’t eat it! So if your dog is outside, you have a chance of it being killed or drugged and still no warning.

However, it your dogs are in the house, they can alert you if they hear a noise of someone trying to get in and of course, your pet stays safe.

Now last week, my alarm went off about 3:30 a.m. and as we have never had a problem, I was sure it was one of the many bugs that seemed to have invaded the house with all of the rains. I looked as far as the office, didn’t see any thing, so went back to bed and turned the alarm back on. It took about a minute for it to go off again and this time I checked carefully to see where exactly I had a problem. This time I realized that the kitchen was the area that had triggered the alarm.

So off I go towards the kitchen (with the Security people on the phone with me of course) and this time something told me to take Harley with me. Now I wasn’t really alarmed or I wouldn’t have been walking through the house – but this time it was different….

As soon as I opened the kitchen door Harley went ballistic! He was barking with a super loud, high pitched and alarmed bray as he raced around the kitchen table, off into the dining room and straight into the lounge and directly to the window where an intruder had obviously escaped. Harley had obviously smelled or heard him (or both) from the time the door opened and given chase. Now I don’t think Harley is a fearless dog; actually I think he was frightened, but gave chase anyway, and that to me is a Hero!

Needless to say, I will NOT again go looking when the alarm goes off. I will patiently wake up and wait for the Security people to arrive and let them do the looking! We are very blessed that not only did no human or dog or cat get injured, but nothing was taken and we didn’t even see the intruder(s).  However they did come in an upstairs window after somehow climbing the wall, so we are now upgrading the outside security system. I am grateful that we had the warning and am duly taking heed. And of course it’s always nice to know that I have back-up in Harley, My Hero!



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
11. A dog will let you put a studded collar on it without calling
you a pervert.
 
13.   YOUR LETTERS

List of new experiences for Sundancer and Sunny

Hi Robyn

After my last amazing riding experience in Oct of this year I injected our horses against African Horse Sickness, which means no or only very light work, in order not to strain their hearts. As the weather decided to become serious humid with high temperatures and the xmas silly season with its parties also arrived it was no work for 6 weeks. Which should result in interesting riding of extremely fresh horses. 

As I stood in the paddock, with BigE hovering around me begging and nipping for carrots and Sundancer careening from one corner of the paddock to the other - he is still challenging to catch, BUT he does not "hide" or run away from me into corners, he will rather run past me, or circle me, then go off just to return a bit later, inching closer until he stands still and I am able to walk up to him and lead him off - I thought it might be a good thing that I was not yet sitting on this bucking boy. Sunny stood still, I walked up to him, offering a carrot, which enticed him to take a few steps towards me and off we went. 

With my horse being rather sweaty after a good run in the paddock Sunny stood rather still to get tacked up, causing me to do clouded leopard touches between his ears and in his poll area - for the first time ever. Sunny actually lowered his head, chewed with soft eyes and allowed my hand, only tossing when I accidentally touched his ears.

I tacked up got on and very apprehensively started riding, waiting for spookiness and too much energy - so what I will stay on or not.

List of firsts again, for the first time we trotted with me sitting and not being jarred silly, for the first time we cantered without me even thinking of standing, for the first time Sunny did not try to race through the arena but maintained a steady rhythm on a loose rein.

And then we went out the following day, and Sunny, who usually walks after not having gone on an outride like a drunk walked decently straight (walking 1 km instead of 2 km on the same stretch of road), listened to my voice commands and kept going on a loose, loose rein.

I had not done even half as much ttouch as I had intended, yet when I rode up to the house to show Frits that a human is able to sit in Sundancer’s trott, he just looked - for years we have been jolted by his choppy and seemingly changing gait all the time that the notion of sitting trott was something we had given up on with Sundancer.

I am truly awed by the changes in Sundancer - he actually plays with BigE, something we have only recently seen him do. Now we are waiting to witness a grooming session....

I see changes in the dogs relatively quickly when using TTouch and am always amazed of the long term effect - but when I see what it has done and is doing for Sundancer I am at a loss for words, it appears as if things are starting to fall into place and he slowly lets go of his past behaviors and starts experiencing anew again, small candles or little sparks of understanding going off.

Thanks to you amazing ladies, Elke

My friends the three Fs, Fright, Freeze and Flight

These three are my personal best friends, who meet me at most outrides, in the most unsuspecting circumstances and make me a good (not graceful or pretty, please!) rider, as I will not walk home but stay on the horse.

1st meeting was while walking down the driveway on the way to a nice, relaxed outride. Tshwane municipality had not collected the rubbish for three weeks, the rubbish bin was standing next to the drive way, slightly ajar to allow for additional bags and was going to attack and eat us. Sunny’s head went straight up, - usually what follows would be the front hooves going up and Sunny rotating 180° on his hind feet breaking into a gallop once the front feet were down to wherever. His usual reaction is Fright, shown by him with his head suddenly arching up like an ostrich, the Freeze, which, with Sunny is truly the calm before the storm, when he stands stock still, rooted into the ground and then the flight, spin and run, or jump 2 – 3 meters sideways into safety.

This time however I let the reins loose, spoke to him in low tones and started with circles along his neck. Sunny turned, not spun uncontrollably, but slowly turned away and walked a few steps from the bin, was turned by me and continued walking towards the bin, every time walking one step closer, while I continued with lying leopard circles along his neck. 

With his neck lowered and his nose at chest height loose reins and a very wary sideways glance at the bin, we managed to pass this obstacle. No fight, no shouts, no tightening of reins, no smacks or noises from my side.

The other rubbish bins also wanted to eat us, but by now, once Sunny’s head came up and I started toning to him, I just had to touch his neck, which lowered instantly and we were able to walk on.  Walking back into the driveway Sunny stopped and had a good sniff of the rubbish bin and just walked past.

LETTER RECEIVED AFTER TTOUCH WEEKEND -          

Buddy is a Shar Pei that was found at 4 years on the side of the road. He had septic wounds and was starving. Hates being held closely – actually goes into a panic when physically restrained. One day one of the weekend, we couldn’t touch him anywhere under his belly or near his feet. His tail had been broken in several places & he hates going to the Vet.

Good morning Eugenie

I have to share with you the amazing difference in Buddy’s behaviour since Sunday.

In the past few days he has "blossomed" and become a happy, confident animal with a tail that doesn’t stop wagging.

Last night we saw him actually chasing that bent and scarred tail, something he has never done since we found him. We have a 10-month-old Labrador pup and Buddy has been stealing his toys and playing chase and hide and seek with him every day. He is eating better and generally seems to have acquired a new zest for life. I must tell you that on Monday morning he was ready and waiting to get in the car to go for another session.

I am absolutely amazed at the effect TTouch has had. I have seen results before on my old dog that Scotty helped, but the change in Buddy is miraculous. He is still very vocal but I think that is his nature and part of his charm.

I have been using the Sensation harness and balance leash on the other dogs with very good results. I would like to purchase another harness and leash for my daughter to use on the Labrador. We walked him this morning in it and he walks much better than in the conventional collar.

Thank you and your wonderful assistants

Regards

Barbara Partner

                                                                                                       



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
12. If a dog smells another dog on you, they don't get mad. They just think it's interesting.
*****************************************************

Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
13. Dogs like to ride in the back of a pickup truck.

 
14.   ODDS AND ENDS

a. Book of the Month: 100 Ways to Solve Your Dog’s Problems by Sarah Fisher

This is the latest great book by Sarah Fisher! Over the years I’ve had many people ask me which touches they should be using for specific problems and now Sarah has written a book to guide people in their choices of what tools to use for each problem. She and Marie Miller use Ttouch bodywork, clicker training and TTouch Groundwork exercises in each of the 100 Problems that are addressed in this book. So along with talking about the problem and what you can do to solve it, it includes a box with what touches to use and a box with what groundwork might be useful.

b. Website of the Month: http://positivepetzine.com/node/360

Wow, what great video footage and all around website. A must for all dog lovers.

There are articles as well, so have  a look!

c: Interesting Links

·         http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7RZ2oCGs0c&NR=1 - Teaching Target Stick – from Kay Laurence’s book. It’s   a great way to get your dog started on clicker training. We always use it in the first session of our clicker class!

·         http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LNqzAvl7Ls&feature=related - Get your visual “puppy fix”! It’s about hand  feeding 6 week old puppies in order to get them to pay attention and start to have some impulse control. An easy and early way to teach sit!

·         http://natgeotv.com/uk/talking-to-animals - This is the site of Sarah Fisher’s TV program. Go on to read about it and maybe even request a re-run in South Africa!

·         http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGODurRfVv4 - Service to Surface Dog: A most amazing and uplifting Video! Don’t miss this one!

·         http://www.flickr.com/photos/31012926@N03/show/ - If you love nature photography, you’ll love this link!

15.   EVENTS

a.      Fundraiser for Border Collie Rescue at the Barnyard 

March 5. Celebrate the music of the 60’s and 70’s with LM Radio.  Barnyard Theatre Broadacres, Cedar Road, Fourways. To book contact Irene at 082 744 7590 or email on tailsup@mweb.co.za, or Dian  082 770 4733 / 011 615 1525

b.  Book place in “The Cattery” now for Easter. Niki Elliott, a wonderful TTouch Practitioner has a new Cattery in Bryanston. Be sure to make early bookings now for Easter! Contact Niki on 082 451 0433



Why Some Men Have Dogs And Not Wives:
And last, but not least:
14. If a dog leaves, it won't take half of your stuff.
 
16.   DOGS & CATS NEEDING HOMES

Chocolate is about 6 years old and he is a beautiful dark chocolate coloured dachshund. Owner deceased - Doesn’t get on with cats. Contact Renee on 011-822-2033 or 076-279-2450

Young Mom and kittens looking for home (not together)

I was locuming at a vet practice in Edenvale earlier this week and there was 1 mother and 4 kittens brought in for euthanasia - perfectly healthy cats.  I am trying to find homes for 3 of these kittens (1 already has a home!) and for the mom who is still only about a year old. Mom is a beautiful black and white cat, short haired.  One baby is black in colour and the other one white.   Please contact Martin on 082 9777 287.

      Beautiful Jack and Jilly looking for new place to sleep. Two little Jack Russell terriers, whose original     family emigrated to New Zealand. They are 11 years old with sweet natures, and are very good with children. Ideally they need to be homed together in a home without other bitches. Contact Gavin Smith on 083 383 5792 or Helen Smith on 083 452 4921. Gavin can also be e-mailed at gavin.smith@cosiragroup.com

Sokkies.  She is a black and white shortish female kitten. She loves to sleep on your feet and on the bed. She is looking for a good, loving home where she can be loved. We are in Pretoria.  Charmaine / Pieter at 0727682173 / 0729426207

Pluto - Beautiful Ridgeback to give you love – 6 years old, neutered.  He’s a wonderful loving dog – very affectionate   and   wants to be close to humans      all the time. He’s also very playful, vigilant and obedient! Not used to cats but he’s been fine with ours (we have 4) – he’s VERY curious about them but no aggression at all. He’s fine with smaller dogs and other dogs. He’s obviously had a good home before as he listens to basic commands very obediently. He’s a typical, well balanced, fantastic Ridgeback.  If you would like to view or adopt Pluto, please contact Jan Viljoen on jan.viljoen@xpertskills.com or 083-7723281.

Companion horse to home

From Trish,in Jhb: I am looking for a good home for a horse. His Name is Gods’ Gift Ian-Vhor Finvarra. He is an Irish Sport Horse by the Irish Draught Stallion Etherow Impasse and a Thoroughbred Bold Ruler Mare called Ultimate Gloss. He is Liver Chestnut with a blaze. I got him as a colt (he has been gelded since) and he developed Horse Sickness. He was so weak that he spent most of his time lying down. I think that he tried to stand up, slipped in his stable and fractured his leg.
Anyway, he is quite happy and carries on like a normal horse but he will never be sound. His leg wasted away and the muscle has never returned, and he can’t move his leg normally. He gallops around the paddock on 3 legs. He isn’t sound therefore he can’t even be used as a hack. He is a wonderful horse to work with. He has a lovely temperament and is kind and loving. I’m looking for somebody who needs a companion horse. Please let me know if you can help as far as a companion horse goes. You can contact Trish on
trishcoe@gmail.com

Three lovely Johannesburg dogs desperate for home – Hanna, Gabby and Baghira

Their family are moving next week, and they will be alone at home.  Hanna can go on her own, as she gets bullied by the other 2, and loves people, they are sterilised, and their vaccinations are up to date. Hanna & Gabby are Labrador X GSD, and Baghira is Dalmatian X Boerboel.  Contact: Biba biba@mushroom.co.za

Cats to adopt

Shadow (black male) and Snowy (white male), both neutred, 3 years and 11 month old males, urgently need a wonderful new home.  Situated in Leandra. MARIAM can be contacted on 0176831170, 072-5845884 or domino85@vodamail.co.za

Senior Ridgies looking for love in a home

We have a 8 year old male and a 10 year old female whose owners passed away in October (Mom) and December (Dad) they have no family and have only been in South Africa for a few years. They came from Zim with just about nothing. I have been trying everyone I can think of to help, and everyone says they are too old. They are so lonely and do not even want treats just love. Is there any one who has an older relative who may take these 2 ridgies in? The only other thing we can do is put them to sleep. Their photos are on our website www.rhodesianridgeback.org.za Liz Penprase  Mobile: +27 82 803 2178, Home: +27 11 803 1892 or 087 808 7710

Cats needing home

2 adorable kittens 8 weeks old, looking for home.  One black with blue eyes and the other one tortoiselle.  Contact Christine Momberg at Tel: +27 (0) 11 233 0000 or Cell: + 27 (0) 82 469 1913

4 month old Labrador looking for home

We have a four month old Labrador cross puppy looking for a loving forever home!   He was abandoned by his owner after he fell ill but he is now well recovered.  He is pitch black and very friendly with other animals. He loves to eat and loves to play constantly.  Contact Tracy Fenton 083 297 3924 OR tracyfenton29@gmail.com

Eugenie Chopin, Certified TTouch Practitioner III for Companion Animal

PO Box 729, Strathavon 2031

Tel: 011 884-3156

Fax: 011 783 1515

Email: echopin@icon.co.za, Website: www.ttouch.co.za

 
© 2006 TTouch - eugenie@ttouch.co.za.   All Rights Reserved.
 

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