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  Newsletter:
  NOVEMBER 2007, TELLINGTON TTOUCH NEWSLETTER
1.   EUGENIE'S LETTER
2.   PRACTITIONER TRAINING
3.   HORSE WORKSHOPS
4.   DOG WORKSHOPS
5.   TTOUCH TIPS
6.   CLICKER TIPS
7.   CLICKER CLASSES
8.   PUPPIES
9.   HEALTH
10.   SHANTI UPDATE
11.   YOUR LETTERS
12.   ODDS AND ENDS
13.   EVENTS
14.   DOGS & CATS NEEDING HOMES
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1.   EUGENIE'S LETTER

Hello TTouch Friends,

Well, I’m now really in Holiday mode. I finished teaching last week and revel in having each day as an open possibility! Of course, there are things like finishing up this Newsletter to occupy me, but that is usually a pleasure.

We had a wonderful training with Robyn Hood in October and everyone who attended both Horse and Companion Animal Trainings were thrilled to work with her. And many thanks to Practitioner, Carmen Leonard of Broshacarm Kennels, for hosting us!

On a personal level, I almost lost my old dog, Danilo, the dog that brought TTouch to South Africa. He is turning 18 this month and one evening when we got back from the training, I noticed he wasn’t his usual self. We rushed him off to the Vet, but had to wait for the next day to find out what was really going on with him. It turned out that he had bronchial Pneumonia as well as a double bladder infection! Well, my brilliant Vet pulled him through and now we are taking it one day at a time, as mobility is a huge issue for him. If you’d like to know more about what I’m doing and that painful look at when is the right time to let a pet go, scroll down to “Shanti and Friends” for an update.

The Holiday Season is now really here and I hope that each of you is planning to take some special time for yourself. I am feeling very much in need of doing this, so am off to the bush next week, which I find cleansing and refreshing. Wherever you go, make sure that your pets are well cared for while you are away.

I wish you a wonderful Holiday Season and an inspiring New Year!

Warmest Regards,

Eugenie Chopin

Certified Practitioner III for Companion Animals

eugenie@ttouch.co.za



A Labrador's 12 Days of Christmas

On the first day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
The Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
2.   PRACTITIONER TRAINING

TTACT III, session 3 – April 23 - 28, 2008

This 3-year training started early in 2007, so next April will already be our 3rd session. This means that if anyone has missed starting the training this year, then still joining us becomes a bit complex.

Having said that, we sometimes let very enthusiastic people join is session 3 if they have attended a number of weekend trainings, etc. If you are someone who would like to do this, please contact us here in the office and we’ll fill you in on the details. A must for anyone in Gauteng would be joining the 6-week class that starts Feb. 2nd.

The cost of the 6-day course will be R3900 + VAT.

If you are interested in knowing more, please contact Eugenie on 011 884-3156 or email eugenie@ttouch.co.za  or phone the office on 011 884-3156



On the second day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
3.   HORSE WORKSHOPS

For the first time ever a TTEAM Clinic will be hosted in Cape Town by Edie Jane Eaton – an International TTEAM Instructor and Feldenkrais Practitioner.

VENUE

HORSE

DATE

COST

CONTACT

Sorgh Vliet Lodge Hout Bay
Cape Town
TTEAM CLINIC
3 days or 6 days Option

10 – 15 May 2008

  3 Days – R2100
6 Days – R3700
excl.

Catherine Williams
quadrisense@gmail.co.za
082 569 8641

Sorgh Vliet LodgeHout Bay
Cape Town
TTEAM Demo
Clinic Participants Free

10 May 2008

  R180  excl.         

Catherine Williams
quadrisense@gmail.co.za
082 569 8641



On the third day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
4.   DOG WORKSHOPS

The TTouch class is a great way to learn & absorb TTouch at it’s best. Over a 6-week period, you have the opportunity to go home, practice and then come back for more! SEE YOUR DOG MAKE CHANGES IS A FEW WEEKS!

For more info, call 011 884-3156 or email eugenie@ttouch.co.za

VENUE

DOG

DATE

COST

CONTACT

                         Sandown
Johannesburg
                                             6 Week TTouch Class

                   
02 February   2008

            R650

Eugenie Chopin
011 884 3156
eugenie@ttouch.co.za



On the fourth day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
5.   TTOUCH TIPS

BODY WRAPS – PART 2 - BY EUGENIE CHOPIN

HOW TO WRAP!
We had a great response last month from the body wrap article so now of course I’m under pressure to describe “how to” do it! I think the first thing you need to know is there isn’t a right or wrong way. We have many different configurations of wrapping dogs and I will endeavour to give you a few. I feel I also again have to caution you that although the wrap is a wonderful tool to use in many situations, I strongly urge you to remember that it is but one aspect of the TTouch work which includes the Touches as well as Groundwork and that the use of all three is recommended for success! 

T-Shirt Wrap

This is a way of giving your dog some sense of its body without needing an elastic bandage and it sometimes easier for certain dogs.  Use an appropriate size T-shirt, such as a child’s T-shirt for small dogs, an adult medium or large for mid-size dogs, and extra large for large dogs.

Place the T-shirt over the dog’s head backward, with the front of the shirt facing up.  Put the dog’s front paws through the armholes.  Take the loose material near the hem and gather it into a knot or secure with a scrunchie at the waist on top of the back.

Variation:  Cut an X in a plastic can lid, thread the hem through, and pull it comfortably tight.  The lid will hold the fabric in place.

Advantage: some dogs will tolerate this and not the bandage; you probably have one in your cupboard already; it doesn’t look like your dog has an injury!

Disadvantage: It doesn’t include the buttock area which is important for fear issues

Elastic Bandage Wraps

The bandages are elastic, very stretchy and beige in colour.  They come in 2-, 3-, 4- and 6-inch widths. We get ours from the Medical reps and have them available in the TTouch office.  Bandages are held in place with diaper safety pins.  When fastening wraps on the back, do not pin directly on the spine.

Remember: Safety pins can come open, so please be safe and use a Baby pin!

Use a 2-inch bandage for small dogs, a 3- or 4-inch bandage for large dogs, and a 4- or 6-inch bandage for giant breeds.  Small dogs need only one, large dogs need two, and giant breeds may need three.  You might need to trim a bit for the best fit for your animal. We also find that there are a few Horse exercise bandages that although are a bit heavy, can be used for a very large breed. These are available at your local Tack Shop

Half-Body Wrap

Place the centre of the wrap at the centre of the dog’s upper chest.  Bring the ends up on either side to cross over the shoulders, then down behind the front legs, crossing under the belly, and up to the centre of the back.  Fasten the ends with a Baby pin. 

Variation: As the dog adjusts, pull the pinned portion back to the lower spine.  Later pull it back around the hips at the top of the tail.  These adjustments provide some of the benefits of a Full-Body Wrap and help the dog accept that configuration.
Variation: Place the Half-Body Wrap over a T-Shirt.

Advantage: Because it doesn’t go over the hindquarters dogs find it easier to accept; it’s a good way to begin to bring awareness into the body. Therefore it’s great for dogs that are shy, concerned about their Hindquarters, or wild and you just want to get something on them! Always a good way to start if you’re unsure!

Disadvantage: Very few except that it doesn’t go over the hindquarters but is possible to extend into the hindquarters with a second wrap later.

Full-Body Wraps

We generally refer to a full body wrap as connecting the front chest of the body to the rear end or buttock area. There are many ways to do this. Below are some ideas. If you want to try your own configuration I usually advise that in the beginning, one of the ideas is to help put the dog into balance, so keeping it more or less symmetrical is a good idea.

#1 Full Wrap in Two Stages: Leaving the Half-Body Wrap in place, fold a second bandage in half to find its centre.  Slip one end under the pinned part of the Half-Body Wrap and pull it through until its centre is under the pin. Fold it over so it is two layers thick and moving from the waist straight back toward the tail.  Remove the pin and use it to secure all four layers at this intersection, or use a second pin to do this, avoiding the top of the spine. (If the wrap is threaded under the first wrap, you might not need to pin at all)

Separate the two ends and pull them under the abdomen on either side in front of the hind legs (without crossing), back between the legs, then up on either side of the tail.  Secure the ends onto the bandage on the lower back with another Baby pin.

Advantage: It may be easier to get the buttock cover with an extension rather than starting from scratch - as hopefully the half wrap has had some effect on the dog.

Variation A: If your bandage is long enough, pin the ends up onto the crossover part of the half wrap.

Advantage: Less likely to slip down over the buttocks

Tip: You might still need to use a second pin where the bandage goes over the hip area to hold it in place.

Variation B: After the second wrap is connected to the half wrap, bring the 2 ends straight down the spine towards the tail and take each end over a buttock, under the inside of the leg (not crossing over to the other side) and up to where the 2 wraps meet – pin there.

Advantage: Can be neater and less likely to slip off the dog’s buttocks – always depending upon the shape of your dog!

#2 Simple Full Body Front of Thigh: Take the centre of the wrap, place on the chest just under the front of the dogs neck, pull the ends up over & across the back, then between the 2 back legs from the front of the leg (without crossing – means pup can still do his business!) – and up by the side of the tail and return along the back. Pin to the bandage where it crosses the back.

Tip:  If you have slippage near the buttocks, you might want to secure the 2 pieces of elastic a second time closer to the tail. Be careful not to be on top of the tail, particularly if it’s a dog that already has confidence problems.

Variation: You might want to rather go down the back and over the buttocks first, then down next to the tail, under the leg from back to front and finally up the side of the body and pin on top to the 2 pieces of bandage going already down the body.

Advantage: Less likely to slip down the legs.

#3 Double Diamond Wrap: Use a single length of elastic or two bandages pinned/sewn together. (Depends on the size of your dog) Place the centre of the wrap over the centre of the dog’s chest.  Pull the ends back and up to cross over the shoulders, down to cross under the belly, up to cross over the small of the back, then through the inner thighs from front to back and up on either side of the tail to the cross at the small of the back.  Secure the ends at this intersection with a Baby pin.

Advantage: It covers more of the body

Disadvantage: Usually Too much wrap for a small dog

Variation: Instead of pulling the ends up on either side of the tail, wrap the left end around the left hind leg and pin it in place at the top of the thigh; wrap the right leg the same way. 

Advantage: This variation engages the hind legs, which might be an area you where you want to bring more awareness.

Tip:  The wrap should be snug but not tight enough to interfere with walking.

#4 Debby Wrap: (named for one of the Instructors) Use a single length of elastic or two bandages pinned/sewn together.  Holding one short end, tie a loose overhand knot around the dog’s neck Or pin the pieces together.  Pull the rest of the bandage straight down the spine to the base of the tail.  At the right side of the tail (over the buttock), bring the bandage down inside the right rear leg and toward the front of the leg, then up and across the small of the back to the left side.  This creates a flank-to-flank cross-piece.

Thread the wrap through the inner thigh of the left hind leg, front to back, and up the rear on the left side of the tail.  Tuck the wrap under the flank-to-flank cross-piece and bring it up to the neck [if you have enough wrap] and pin where the wrap connects just behind the neck already. Pin at this point.

Tip:   Using a pin rather than a knot will make the wrap hug the body better.

Tip:  If your wrap it too short, fasten pin where the “cross-piece” goes over the lower back

Tip:  If you have extra wrap, you can extend to under the chest.

Advantages: I often find that this wrap stays on the dogs rear end easier; can help support older dogs in the hips.

Disadvantage: Be careful with dogs with bad HD. It’s important to watch a dog with a wrap on and see if he walks easier or is it worse.

Tip: Also important is to watch the after effects of the wrap. Sometimes you think nothing is happening, but when you take the wrap off, the dog is better!

GENERAL: The configuration of your wrap often depends on the shape of your dog. For instance a Double diamond wrap might be hard to keep on a sloped back of a German Shepard.  If one doesn’t work, then try another! Or make up your own. Be creative!

  • How long to keep it on? As Instructor Debby Potts always says: “Depends on the Dog”

  • You might want to start with 20-30 minutes, but you could certainly do longer. Do a short time each day and start to notice what effect it has.

  • Try to Use the wrap when the dog is active and walking as one of the uses is to bring awareness into the body. If a problem, then work with what the dog can handle.

  • Be careful NEVER TO LEAVE YOUR DOG UNATTENDED when using the wrap. Like any equipment, it could catch on something and cause an accident.

  • If the beige colour is a bit bland for you, dye it a cheerful colour for more fun!

  • If you can’t find or afford to buy an elastic bandage, use whatever you might have around. We don’t really recommend crepe bandages as they tend to crumple and not hold their flatness & shape over the body, but it “might” be enough to help. Try it and see. But if you don’t have results, please don’t say that the wrap doesn’t work!

  • If your dog has sore hips or knees, a full wrap might be too much. Do start with a Half Wrap before venturing further. Also use a half wrap first on a fearful or very nervous dog.

  • There are a few dogs that find the wrap very difficult. Fortunately they are a very small minority! (Unfortunately my pointer, Shanti is one!) In this case, start with a Half wrap (or T-shirt), leave for very short periods of time and be sure to treat the dog with something special when the wrap is on. You might for instance feed your dog every day only when the wrap is on. In this way, the wrap would come to indicate that something good is coming his way. Chances are that within a short period of time, the dog will look forward to having the wrap brought out!]

  • If your dog freezes when the wrap if first put on, coax forward with food, chat or play. Most dogs soon learn that they can actually walk freely!

  • Be sure to be respectful of their concerns. Many people have the tendency to laugh when they first see their dogs in a wrap. It can look “rather” strange! So have fun and laugh “with them”, not “at them”. After all, the whole idea is to boost their confidence.

  • It’s a great way to meet and chat to people. Everyone will want to know what “happened” to your dog. See if you can explain what you’re doing. Check out the Jan Newsletter if you’ve forgotten!

  • The effect of the wrap is cumulative. I have many clients who have used wraps on their dogs daily and by the time the thunder storms comes around, they don’t really need it! – Please don’t however, think that this is the norm, All Dogs are Different!

  • If you want to buy a wrap, please email us at info@ttouch.co.za and tell us what breed of dog you have. Anything other than a very small breed will take one and a half to 2 Bandages. It depends on which wrap you use. We will send you a list of prices and payment details. You may also be able to buy a wrap from your nearest Practitioner. Please look on the Practitioner page on our website at http://www.ttouch.co.za/

  • Cost of bandages runs between R50 – R70 per bandage depending upon the width.

  • If you haven’t understood how to do the wrap from this email, please don’t ask me for a better explanation! Rather call your nearest Practitioner for a proper Demo. 

  • Good luck and let me know how you do! Lots of love, Eugenie

 Copyright: Eugenie Chopin - Tellington TTouch South Africa

 If you’d like to read the entire article, go to http://www.ttouchsa.co.za/files/articles/article.php?art=316

Eugenie Chopin is a Tellington TTouch Practitioner, Level 3 for Companion Animals with a specialty in dogs. She gives Clicker Classes and runs the TTouch office here in South Africa.



On the fifth day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Five chewed-up stockings
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
6.   CLICKER TIPS

ZOmg! It Works: Posted by: "Laura Baugh" shinteetah@gmail.com   shinteetah

ZOMG!one! This clicker training stuff works! ;-)

My husband is not, um, gifted in natural tidiness. For the last week there has been a pile of dirty laundry in our bathroom. I have been irritated by it, but I have been carefully extinguishing the unwanted behavior of dropping laundry by refusing to reinforce it: laundry not in the proper place does not get washed. (It has nothing to do with the fact that I am spiteful and stubborn, no, it is purely good behaviorism. Honest. Really.)

Tonight, Jon came home late and shed his clothes in the bathroom, adding to the pile. I said nothing from my spot on the bed. He then picked up one item from the pile and started through the bathroom door.

"Click!" I said brightly.

He stopped, looked at me, and smiled widely. Then he chucked the jeans toward the laundry and announced, "If I’m going to get clicks, I’m going to pick up the rest of it." And he returned for the other items.

"Click!" I repeated.

He deposited the rest of the laundry. "All that’s left is my shoes."

I said nothing. He considered and then returned for his shoes.

"Click!"

He put the shoes away and then came for a mutually-reinforcing kiss.

Now, under most circumstances, I would recommend reinforcing after each individual click, but if the subject gets excited about the training task, it is permissible to continue work until the subject returns for reinforcement, possibly a jackpot....

But look at this clicker training stuff! Works on all species! /grin/

Laura & Shakespeare, Inky, Laevatein

(Taken, with permission, from the Clicker Solutions List)



On the sixth day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Six yards of soggy ribbon
Five chewed-up stockings
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
7.   CLICKER CLASSES

Next 6 week class only early in 2008!

This class will include 4 x three hour sessions on How Dogs learn
and 6 practical session on Clicker Training with Dogs

If you have always wanted to learn a method of training that doesn’t need aversives to be effective, then join us for a Clicker Experience! Although Operant Conditioning and the Clicker have been around for many years, especially in the Marine World and in training many species of animals for film, it’s only in the last 10 years that it has started to become Mainstream in the Dog Training World. Here is your chance to catch up!


DATES:          Without dogs: Wednesdays: Jan 30, Feb 6, 13, 20                                 18:00 – 21:00                       

                        With dogs:      Saturdays:  Feb 2, 9, 16, 23, Mar 1, 8                               9:30 – 11:30

VENUE:          Sandown– Johannesburg

BOOK:            Eugenie Chopin at eugenie@ttouch.co.za  or phone 011 884 3156 for more info.

COST:            Full Class: R1200: this includes the cost of the course, notes, book, treat bag, target stick and a clicker. When you have paid your R600 deposit you are welcome to come and get your book early.

Learning Theory Only: R600: this includes evening lectures, a book, File with notes & clicker

If you have been wondering what the fuss is all about, Clicker Training is basically about re-enforcing Behaviour that you want. It works on the principles of giving reward for correct behaviour rather than using corrections and aversives for unwanted behaviour. As a result, you can establish true respect from your dog without fear. It’s fun to do, the dogs love it and therefore gain in confidence and you can finally understand why they do the things they do and how your Behaviour and actions influence them daily!

NOTE: An aversive is anything the dog doesn’t like! So if you yell at your dog and it likes the attention, it might actually be a reward!

This class is designed to teach those who want to truly understand the concepts of Operant Conditioning, how animals learn, how to get through the barriers that stop the learning process and how to move forward in small enough steps to be successful in anything that you want to teach. If you are a Trainer, are interested in being a Trainer, or just are a dog owner who wants to understand more, then this might be the class for you!

Eugenie’s next 6-Week Clicker & Leaning Theory Class will start January 30th , 2008!  

PLACE/VENUE

DOG

DATE

COST

CONTACT

Johannesburg
Sandown

6 Weeks Clicker & Learning Theory Classes 

Starts 30th January

Sat. Mornings [theory: Wed.]

 

R1200

   Eugenie Chopin
    011 884-3156 

echopin@icon.co.za

8.   PUPPIES

SPRING TIME IS PUPPY TIME !!!

From the Dogsense Newsletter by Claire Grobbelaar

Are you considering getting a puppy or know of some one who might be looking for a puppy. The following pointers can assist you in making an informed decision.

  • Only take the puppy home at the age of 8 weeks. For reasons visit www.dogsense.co.za/newslist.php and see article "Pitfalls of adopting out too soon".

  • Avoid puppies that have been raised in an outdoor kennel or in the back yard only. Puppies that have been raised in the owner’s house, with all the household social happenings, since birth are much more adaptable and sociable as adults.

  • Be sure to view the mother and father of the litter, if possible.

  • Don’t be tempted or talked into taking two puppies at the same time. You could be setting yourself up for a series of potential behaviour problems; however dogs are social animals and need companionship. Best is to obtain a puppy, have him settle in with the rules and structures you provided, train him to be a well adjusted and well mannered pet, and then get your second dog. Chances are good that the second pup will learn from the older dog.

  • Try and stay in contact with the breeder and owners of the other litter mates.

  • The puppy should be taken to your vet as soon as possible for a check up, de-worming and vaccinations, if due.

  • Choose your puppy’s name with consideration. See www.favorite-puppy-names.com

  • Who will hold the puppy when you drive home? This is an excellent bonding experience for owner and new dog. Take with the new blanket that the puppy will be sleeping on in his new bed.

  • Have you decided where the puppy will sleep the first few weeks? It is best if he can sleep close to you in an en-suit bathroom, closed off with a baby gate or board, or a big open box/puppy pen/crate in your bedroom. Remember he has just left behind all things familiar and safe. He needs your presence to feel safe and secure.

  • Have you decided what the puppy will be eating? It is usually best to keep the puppy on the same food that the breeder provided for a period of 5-7 days while at the same time mixing in more and more of the new diet.

  • Has the puppy got all the necessary bedding, blankets, bowls, chewy-toys, alone-time-toys, treats, collar/harness, lead and designated alone time area?

  • What is the real reason for obtaining a puppy? A companion, a walking-buddy, you love being around dogs and every thing dog, a social status object (i.e. rare breeds), aesthetic value of the breed, a guard dog only, a playmate for children, to teach your child responsibility? The last five are not good reasons to get a dog - it’s not fair on the dog. Be very sure and honest as to why you want to get a puppy.

  • Does everybody in the household want a new dog?

  • Do you know all about the breed you are interested in? Have you done some research about the specific breed from different sources? Are you aware of that breed’s possible breed-specific-problems?

  • Will the size of your property be appropriate for the breed and size of the dog?

  • Do you already have other dogs or cats, or horses, ducks or bunnies on your property? If you do, consider the type of dog that will fit in.

  • What is your lifestyle like - active and sporty, do you go out a lot or do you prefer to laze around the house, do you work long hours away from home? Will this specific breed fit in with your lifestyle and routine?

  • Have you thought about how your puppy will spend his time while you are at work? Consider puppy-day-care or a mid-day dog-walker (for fully vaccinated pups), chew toys, food dispensing toys, an elimination area.

  • Find out about positive-methods-puppy class availability in your area. Enroll as soon as you know when you’re getting your new puppy as some instructors only take a limited number of puppies per class. These classes are critical for your dog to develop into a well-adjusted and well-mannered family dog. Did you know that by the time your puppy is 16 weeks old he needs to meet at least 100 different people and 100 different dogs to ensure him becoming a well-socialised adult dog?

  • Are you willing to take the puppy to obedience classes after his puppy course? Will you have the time?

  • Does everybody agree about the house-rules for the puppy?

  • Does everybody understand and accept their part in the puppy’s education?

  • Are you aware that all puppies will dig, chew, whine, bark, mouth, bite, or eliminate in the house at some point? Are you prepared for some destruction? Have you ’puppy-proofed’ your house?

  • Have you considered the full financial implications of owning a dog - puppy classes, obedience classes, good quality food, grooming - if necessary, vaccinations, regular de-worming and tick and flea prevention, bedding, toys, chew toys, sterilization and unexpected medical expenses etc.

If any unwanted behaviour arises, will you put the effort, time and money into modifying it?

Claire Grobbelaar is a TTouch Practitioner 1 in Cape Town. She has a great Newsletter you can subscribe to by going to http://www.dogsense.co.za or you can contact her at claire.g@mweb.co.za

 PLACE/VENUE

DOG

DATE

COST

CONTACT

Bryanston
Puppy 1, Puppy 2 , Basic Obedience & Clicker Classes

Classes every Wednesday evening and Saturday afternoon. Private sessions on request.

R300
per month

Niki Elliott

  082 451 0433

niki@thinkingpets.com

Sandringham
Johannesburg
Gauteng
Puppy Socialising Classes

Six week courses on Sundays & Weekday evenings
Ongoing

R400

Kim Heller
082 570 0463
kimh@kti.co.za

Bramley, Lyndhurst, Gresswold, Kew, Waverley
Johannesburg
Gauteng

Puppy Socialising Classes

Six week courses on Sundays

R400

Nicky Lucka
083-408-1517
lucka@absamail.co.za

Centurion
Pretoria
Gauteng
Puppy Socialising, Basic Obedience & Clicker Classes

8 Week Course on Saturdays & Sundays
Ongoing

R600

Heather Whitfield
083 566 7009
whitfield@webmail.co.za

Edenvale
Johannesburg
Gauteng
Puppy Socialising

Sundays Mornings
8 Week Course

R600

Tersia Kock
082 828 0505
terko@ananzi.co.za

Blue Hills / Kyalami
Gauteng
Puppy Socialising, Basic Obedience & Clicker Classes

Saturdays
8 Week Course

R600

Tersia Kock

082 828 0505
terko@ananzi.co.za

Durbanville
Puppy Classes for pups under 4 months.


Ongoing: new every 6 weeks

TBA

Claire Grobbelaar
021 979 0848 or 082 784 7524
 
claire.g@mweb.co.za



On the seventh day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Seven scraps of wrapping paper
Six yards of soggy ribbon
Five chewed-up stockings
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
9.   HEALTH

How To Brush Your Dog’s Teeth by Claire Grobbelaar

  • The first step is to start with a clean, healthy mouth. Good dental hygiene should start with a young pet with healthy new teeth and gums, or after your pet has had a professional dental cleaning.

  • You will need a soft-bristled tooth brush and veterinary toothpaste. Human toothpastes and baking soda may cause problems. Furthermore, veterinary toothpastes have flavors that are appealing to dogs. Anything other than a bristled tooth brush will not get below the gum line, which is the most important area to brush.

  • There are several important facts about our pets’ mouths that tell us when, where and how to brush. Periodontal disease usually affects the upper, back teeth first and worst. Plaque builds up on the tooth surface daily, especially just under the gum line. It takes less than 36 hours for this plaque to become mineralized and harden into "tartar" (calculus) that cannot be removed with a brush. Because of this progression, brushing should be done daily, with a brush to remove the plaque from under the gum line.

  • Pick a time of day that will become a convenient part of your pet’s daily routine. Just before a walk or before a daily treat can help your pet actually look forward to brushing time. Take a few days to let both of you get use to the process. Follow with praise and a walk or treat each time.

  • Start by offering your dog a taste of the veterinary toothpaste. The next time, let him taste the toothpaste, then run your finger along the gums of the upper teeth. Repeat the process with the tooth brush. Get the bristles of the brush along the gum line of the upper back teeth and angle slightly up, so the bristles get under the gum line. Work from back to front, making small circles along the gum lines. It should take you less than 30 seconds to brush your pet’s teeth. Do not try to brush the entire mouth at first. If all that your pet lets you brush is the outside of the upper teeth, you are still addressing the most important area of periodontal disease - prevention. If your pet eventually allows you to brush most of his teeth, so much the better.

  • Even with the best tooth brushing, some dogs may still need an occasional professional cleaning, just like humans. By brushing your pet’s teeth daily and curtailing the amount of periodontal disease, you may reduce the frequency and involvement of dental cleanings and provide your pet with a healthier, sweeter smile.

Claire Grobbelaar is a TTouch Practitioner 1 in Cape Town. She has a great Newsletter you can subscribe to by going to http://www.dogsense.co.za or you can contact her at claire.g@mweb.co.za



On the eighth day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Eight tiny reindeer fragments
Seven scraps of wrapping paper
Six yards of soggy ribbon
Five chewed-up stockings
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
10.   SHANTI UPDATE

Danilo’s Journey is Coming to a Close

My old dog, Danilo will turn 18 this month. It’s hard to realize that almost 20 years have passed since we began our journey together. At the end of October, Robyn and I came home from the Companion Animal Training to find that Danilo wasn’t eating and wasn’t getting out of bed. A trip to the emergency Vet told us that his internal organs were fine, but that something was causing a fever. The next morning I took him to my Vet and after a 2 hour consultation, we knew he had bronchial pneumonia as well as a double bladder infection (including e-coli).

For an old dog, the prognosis wasn’t good, but we put him onto drip medication and within 4 days I was able to take him home, infection free! During those 4 days, I was able to visit Danilo once or twice a day. I’m aware that Vets often don’t want owners visiting too much, but I know that I absolutely need to do this for my animals. However, I think it’s important to know how to stay calm and focused as a stressed owner can stress the animal more and this in turn lowers the immune system. So how much you visit really depends on your attitude and what you can do for your dog. For instance, I would just sit, talk to him and do a bit of TTouch. The time was spent in just being together and visualizing him coming home when he was better. Of course, being in the country and having a beautiful garden in which to sit with him, made a huge difference. So if there’s a possibility of your pet going outside with you for your visit, all the better.

Once Dan came home, we had to get some things to help keep us clean, as he was leaking urine etc.  DisChem was a great aid. I managed to buy “wet proof’ bed sheets to put on a couple of the dog beds, some adult diapers that I could just slip under him to catch the over flow and some plastic sheeting from the hardware, which I have put in stratigic carpeted areas where he likes to lie. All of this because it’s easier to wash a sheet or throw than a cushion! We have also over time had to buy many meters of the rubberized mats so that he can walk over tiles and the plastic sheets, but it has been an absolute necessity to keep him upright.

Needless to say, all of this has taken a huge emotional toll, especially in the beginning. As I knew that even if Danilo got over the infections, our time together was getting shorter and shorter. I have since come to terms with the situation with a better state of mind. And that is to live each day in the moment and not stress about “when” it’s the right time to let him move on. This means trusting that I will know when that time has come. I have even booked a ticket to the US for Christmas with the understanding that I might or might not actually get there.

At the moment, Danilo has stuggled to walk for a couple of days so we have upped the cortisone to see if it has an effect. If we can’t get him walking this week, then I’ll know it’s time to let him go. So there is the delimma- how long to go on. Here is a dog who is loving his food, is demanding attention and who often has a bright look on his face (espeically when there is a good food smell around!). I have to trust that if he isn’t seriously trying to walk, that he’s telling me it’s all too much for him now.

Please wish me luck and send lots of good energy & prayers our way, as I know I’m going to need it in the very near future.



On the ninth day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
My wreath in nine pieces
Eight tiny reindeer fragments
Seven scraps of wrapping paper
Six yards of soggy ribbon
Five chewed-up stockings
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
11.   YOUR LETTERS

ANNIE - OUR ANGEL GIRL – by Sally Berriman
“ Jane, I think she’s gone….” 

My words, scarcely uttered for fear of them being true, slipped out into that bright Balgowan balmy day – sun shining in a bright blue sky, the winter warmth spreading across my back as I knelt on the long grass beside my beloved cavalier, Annabelle. Clearly, she had been kicked by my horse and was in deep shock, her pupils dilated and her breathing laboured as a trickle of blood came from her nose into the grass as she lay there. 

Only minutes before she had been running free next to my horse, enjoying the freedom of her first outride, with wide open spaces and the limitless joy of boundless space.  We were at our favourite spot, up Gallopy Hill where the smells of wild birds and bush buck are on every patch of the dry winter earth…and here she was, small, limp and seemingly lifeless.

Her stiff struggle of a seizure had been calmed by my voice and the reassurance of my massage. I prayed hard, and struggled to keep my voice steady and in control, talking to her all the time.  Talking to her was able to keep that gut-wrenching feeling at bay of my recurring nightmare of a few years before, of holding that warm, limp body of our little puppy, Rosie,  who had died after a freak accident.  I decided “ NO!”  THIS WON’T HAPPEN TO YOU ANNIE-KINS.”  Think, think… talk, talk; keep her with us… 

I blocked out the sound of  Jane’s  crying as she held our horses, and asked her to walk the horses back and fetch my car to take Annie to the vet.   Annie was breathing again… her little ribcage moving ever so slightly.  Yes, her lips were still pink and that was a good sign…

Sitting alone with her on the top of that hill, time went by in slow motion –  I re-lived her short little life of seven months as  I furiously massaged the tips of her ears and kept thinking positive thoughts.  She was salivating badly and her bleeding nose meant she could only breathe through her mouth and this was proving difficult for her.  As I gently rubbed her all over, I kept talking, for fear of the dark thoughts that would seep into my head.  Talk, talk, and rub, rub.  Rubbing her ears especially, all I could remember were Doreen’s words of advice – “ If your dog is ever in an accident, or severely traumatised, rub the tips of the ears to help with the shock….”

My feeling of helplessness dissipated as I remembered all my Tellington Touch training as I worked furiously and desperately on little Annie.  All my energy went into her, through my voice and my hands.  Her limp body had relaxed and her eyes were looking more normal.  I can remember thinking that it was such a beautiful day, and this was such a beautiful dog – she just HAS to pull though…

It is now five days since that awful day.  Annie is still at the vet, off the drip now, and we wait to see if she has sight in her left eye from the head trauma of the kick.  Her bright, plucky character is coming back slowly each day. More and more I can see her bouncy indomitable spirit returning – at first only a glimmer, but growing stronger and stronger.    Thanks to the dedication of the vet team, I hope to bring her home soon – and to be able to cuddle this special girl.  I am convinced she loved me enough to come back to me, through the chaos and the pain, and fight for her life.  Our precious, darling Annie – surely she is one of God’s angels sent to be with us on Earth?

Sally Berriman

All Dogs Need Jobs By Eric Francis Coppolino

I am writing on behalf of all dogs on the occasion of the Year of the Dog, which began with the New Moon on Jan. 29. Dogs were among the 12 animals who responded when Buddha summoned the beasts of the Earth to his side, and this is why they have a place in the Chinese zodiac.


People think they know their dogs, or know something about dogs in general. I think that because they’re in touch with their instincts, most dogs know more than most people. I would offer that the first thing you need to know about dogs is that they all need jobs.

Your dog already knows this. You can tell because she growls or barks when she hears a suspicious sound. Do you think she’s doing this to entertain herself? Nobody had to explain it to her or train her to do it (this is the definition of an instinct). It may sound like common sense, but humans need to be reminded: Your dog’s responding to strange sounds have the single purpose of protecting you and your family. The sound of your dog growling could be the sound that saves your life.

Plenty of dogs get yelled at for keeping an eye and ear on things, representing a threat of exclusion (which for a pack animal is a pretty severe form of punishment). However, I suggest that this be the first job you give your dog, and when she starts barking, thank her for paying attention and hearing things that you can’t; then, if she expresses that fine enthusiasm for all things at which dogs excel, explain it’s okay, she can stop now. It’s not that the Boston Strangler is necessarily on your front doorstep; the point is that somebody is paying attention, and that’s rather helpful here on Planet Fog.

Dogs want nothing more than to be part of the human experience, to be part of the collective life they perceive around themselves. They want and need to be useful. This is a feeling that can at times be quite alien to humans, who claim to abhor being "used." I propose that dogs offer the lesson that we all need to be used, as in useful.

Most breeds of dogs were developed for some kind of work. Whether it was catching rats or hunting foxes; retrieving quail or keeping a herd of 100 cattle in line; dogs are born with a sense of purpose, and if you’ll notice from their various job descriptions, that sense of purpose is vital to the human community. It usually involves survival. A dog whose genetic code makes him accustomed to working 12 hours a day on a ranch is going to need somewhere to invest that energy and, more important, the sense of participation in human life he would get from being responsible for all those cows.

Since life in Western civilization offers most dogs few opportunities to express anything resembling their original purpose, that leaves them searching for something to do. And as a result, many turn strange or get nervous. We need to be creative at finding them something vital to occupy themselves with, and that something should always involve the common good. Dogs tend to be excellent at cooperating with one another and with people, and they need that sense of cooperation.

The role of guard dog, even for your Chihuahua or Jack Russell, is a fine start, and where there are children in the house, dogs need to be in the first line of protection (or they don’t belong there). Service dogs have it easy. They are trained for a purpose and pretty much get to work full time; they are among the most well-adapted dogs we meet. And they get respect; you can even bring one into the Four Seasons.

Most dogs need to have their role as a companion recognized as a form of work and service. But you can go further. I think dog backpacks are a great idea because they so tangibly convey the idea that there’s something we need them to do. Asking your dog to help you find something you’ve lost, or a place you’re looking for, is not so unreasonable if you learn to listen to your dog and pick up on his or her messages.

It’s been said that one cannot serve two masters, and that dogs cannot have two masters. But that’s not really true. Dogs have a divided nature. They are instinctual, fairly close to their wild cousins, wolves and coyotes. And they are bred to be part of civilization, and to participate in nearly every aspect of life. In creating the breeds, humans have tried to harness and adapt certain levels of instinct to serve their own needs; and the rest of the time, dogs need to behave like good children.

It’s not easy being a dog. It’s not easy for them to manage these two sides of their nature simultaneously, and this is the reason dogs need a structured life, a sense of mission, and experiences that help ground them in both sides of their nature.

Homeopathic medicine has documented this issue in the form of the remedy Lac Caninum, the milk of the dog. The Lac Caninum state of mind is about instincts colliding with the process of civilization.

Often this involves sexuality: Powerful urges and drives meet nearly as powerful repressive forces. The need to appear prudish being met with the inner reality that one is anything but a prude is a good example. The pressure to seem moral and upstanding no matter how hot one’s hormones are raging is another. Any time creative, intuitive or instinctual power is confronted with the need to conform, do the right thing, make a living and be a good girl at the office, the result can be the Lac Caninum state. This is all the worse when our creative or intuitive behavior is punished, which it often is.

The result is often a painfully split nature, which most humans suffer from to some extent. Lac Caninum addresses that split. It also addresses the idea that, like dogs, many people don’t actually have a sense of purpose in life, or an actual sense that they are doing much good at all. That would make me bitchy too.

For both dogs and people, cultivating purpose and a sense of participation is a long process, but you can start right away. What do they want to do? What’s their natural response in any given situation? What are their special skills? As we watch dogs we can study the same things in ourselves.

Fritz Perls, one of the creators of Gestalt therapy, said that to get healthy, people need to "lose their minds and come to their senses." One thing that dogs have going for them is their senses. Their minds work differently than ours do, partly because their sensorium is so vivid, and their impulse to tune into their senses is constant. Dogs are aware; many are aware to the point of constant vigilance (yes, there are some who sleep all day and would not notice if a truck drove in through the living room wall). Any time we allow our dog to be an extension of our own senses, or connect to a dog’s experience of her senses, we’re giving them a job to do, tuning into their instincts, and as a result, tuning into our own.

Dogs provide great examples of two things humans really struggle with: loyalty and unconditional love. From many years of carefully observing dogs, my sense is that their purpose on the planet is to ground heart energy. They are open, and they want to be that way; for them, love is easy, and love means you express your feelings and take care of your people. Your life is their life and theirs is yours.

As it turns out, a dog’s most important job is to teach us to be human.
http://www.chronogram.com/issue/2006/02/planetwaves/index.php



On the tenth day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Ten Christmas cards I shoulda mailed
My wreath in nine pieces
Eight tiny reindeer fragments
Seven scraps of wrapping paper
Six yards of soggy ribbon
Five chewed-up stockings
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
12.   ODDS AND ENDS

a.   Book of the Month:  “UNLOCK YOUR DOG’S POTENTIAL, How to achieve a calm and happy canine” by Sarah Fisher
I am more than thrilled to tell you about this new book by Sarah Fisher. It will help you understand your dog on a new and exciting level. It does include the TTouch Techniques, but it is so much more! There are at least 30 pages of how to Assess your dog, identifying Tension patterns, what that might mean and how to use TTouch to correct them. Altogether an innovative and new concept on working with dogs. There is truly not another book on the market with this information and I strongly urge all dog professionals as well as dog lovers to add this to your library. A great Christmas gift! The TTouch office is expecting 20 books before Christmas so place your orders now. Sorry we don’t yet have a price, but I’m sure it will be well worth it.

Contact Heater at 011 884-3156 or email info@ttouch.co.za

b:  Website of the Month http://www.petexpertise.com/articles.htm

This site offers a great “Free Positive Dog Training eBook” as well as a whole set of articles by Jess Rollins - ranging from Solving Dog Problems to Taking Care of your Dog.

13.   EVENTS

c.  EXCITING WORKSHOP IN APRIL 2008 – PROFESSOR RAYMOND COPPINGER IN SA

Animal Rehabilitation Initiative will be hosting a 2 day workshop with world renowned Ethologist Professor Raymond Coppinger on the 12 & 13 April 2008 in Johannesburg and Cape Town.

This unique workshop will allow delegates the opportunity to spend two days in Professor Coppingers’ company. Ray Coppinger is a Professor of Biology in the School of Cognitive Science at Hampshire College in Massachusetts, USA. He has studied and worked with dogs for decades throughout the world, and brings to light fascinating details about dog behaviour. He and his wife Lorna are the authors of Dogs: A Startling New Understanding of Canine Origin and Behaviour – a must read for everyone involved in the Dog Profession.

Bookings will work on a first come, first serve basis so please let us know well in advance if you would like to secure your seat for this workshop. 

For more information about this workshop, please contact:
Karin Landsberg: 073 269 0418 or Karin@thinkingpets.com

Niki Elliott: 082 451 0433 or Niki@thinkingpets.com

d.   EAGALA - Equine Assisted Psychotherapy /Learning Training

EAGALA the international association for Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association are planning to visit  South Africa to facilitate two training sessions in Equine assisted Psychotherapy / Learning.  These trainings are  open to anyone who is interested in the therapeutic use of the horse.  According to the EAGALA methodology a treatment team must comprise two individuals, of which one is a mental health practitioner and the other a horse expert, so the training is directed specifically at these individuals, however I know of people who’ve joined the training groups purely for their own personal growth needs. 

Should anyone be interested in exploring this exciting form of therapy then they should view the EAGALA website: www.eagala.org . They are also welcome to communicate with me about this either by return e-mail or per telephone. 

The dates for the proposed trainings are Part 1: 23 – 25 November – either in Jhb or CT; Part 2: 30 Nov – 2 Dec – in CT

Please contact Sharon Rufus on 084 500 0672 for more information

e. PETITIONS: WSPA:

I have just read and signed the petition: "Ban Fireworks in South Africa" Please take a moment to read about this important issue, and join me in signing the petition. It takes just 30 seconds, but can truly make a difference. We are trying to reach 100,000 signatures - please sign here: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/287868153

Once you have signed, you can help even more by asking your friends and family to sign as well.

f.  AFRICA HORSEBACK SAFARI: with TTouch Instructor: Edie Jane Eaton

18 – 28 May 2008: 5 Days in Johannesburg, South Africa / 5 Days at Macatoo, Botswana - home of African Horseback Safaris in the magical Okavango Delta.

For South Africans: 5 days in the Delta Only is possible!

For more information contact the TTouch Office or Email: Edie Jane Eaton at ejrett@earthlink.net   



On the eleventh day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
Eleven unwrapped presents
Ten Christmas cards I shoulda mailed
My wreath in nine pieces
Eight tiny reindeer fragments
Seven scraps of wrapping paper
Six yards of soggy ribbon
Five chewed-up stockings
Four broken window candles
Three punctured ornaments
Two leaking bubble lights
And the Santa topper from the Christmas tree.
 
14.   DOGS & CATS NEEDING HOMES

Hi Guys,

There are so many emails circulating about animals needing to find homes urgently. And I know that I send all these emails that come my way onto you. You all must be a little sick of receiving so many emails from me. Lejane from Beauty Without Cruelty has come up with a solution, creating a site for animal adoptions. See Below, Project 1.

I would love to help and if any of u can offer your assisstance and advise, please let me know.

When this website is up and running i could send out a weekly mail of animals up for adoption, with a brief description. I need feedback so please do let me know what you think.   

Thanks

 Siobhan Kelly

PROJECT ONE - Home Finding
On a daily basis, we receive countless emails with pictures of animals that are looking for homes – in fact, I sometimes receive the same email up to four or five times and on one occasion even received something like 37 emails around this issue in one morning.

The things is that many people are coming back to me and saying that although they don’t wish to take themselves off the mailing lists just in case, that too often when faced with so much need, they just delete the mails as there are just too many to cope with.

We are therefore now looking at a person willing to tackle this project and take on the following:
Ř     Some sponsorship from an IT or media company preferably
Ř     Some web space and someone with the skills to set it up
Ř     We need someone to co-ordinate the site and ensure that it stays well managed.

Of course, a lot of discussion would have to go into this, but with a project manager and some solid volunteers, this can change so much and make a huge difference to the current very inefficient system of emails.

If you are keen or can see yourself being able to help, please contact me and I will put you all together via mail and you can then run with the project, keeping the newsletter updated on your progress as you go along.

 I would love to see www.animaladoptions.org.za  as a site soon…

Should anybody be interested in volunteering for the worthy course, please contact Siobhan Kelly on
083 399 3999 or
zoola@mweb.co.za

Retriever looking for a home
We are moving to the UK at the end of this month and need to find a home for our female Golden Retriever.  Her name is Gabby and she is 4 years old.  She has been spayed (she is a bit tubby).  She is house trained and is wonderful with children and toddlers.  Please contact Suzanne on 072 297 4443 if you are able to offer a good home to Gabby?

Bonnie & Clyde: 2 Beautiful Huskies looking for a home
Abandoned and found roaming the rubbish dumps. Starving, flea and tick ridden and definitely on deaths door, they made a slow recovery at an animal sanctuary.  

Clyde, a +/- 1yr old male, is a charming and beautiful baby. He craves human attention and is friendly and outgoing. He has one floppy ear and may be malamute cross. Energetic and gets on with other large dogs. Not friendly towards cats. He is an accomplished climber of walls and 6 foot walling or more, is a must. Needs lots of human attention. Loves water and a kiddies shell pool is a must.  

Bonnie, a +/- 1yr female, is a little more wary of human contact due to obvious bad experiences. She is reserved, energetic, and on the thin side. She has the most beautiful, soulful eyes. Not friendly with cats. Also an escape artist so 6 foot walling is essential. She will need lots of TLC and there must be no place for harsh words and punishment. Has a strong bond with Clyde so if they could be homed together that would be great. She is initially wary and distant around other dogs.

Both Bonnie and Clyde have been sterilized, microchipped, dewormed and vaccinated (1st, will need a booster). Adoption fee is R450-00. Please contact JoAnn at Siberian Husky Rescue, Gauteng: 082 851 9576

Kittens needing a home:
Two rescue kittens available. Rescued from a veld where they were dumped. They have been treated for worms and malnutrition. Both are males, black & white and not older that eight weeks. If anybody is interested, please contact Noelien Badenhosrt on 083 550 3077. They will only go to approved homes.

Very Urgent: Male Red Setter needing a home:
Shamus has unfortunately been orphaned. His owner recently passed away and he needs a new home. He is a real beaut. Red Setters are a rare breed in South Africa. He is good with other dogs. He is presently residing in Hurlingham. If you can offer this boy a loving permanent home, please contact Mrs. Jones 011-482-8297 or 082 426-8534 or Dee Tyler 011 883 8182

Urgent adoption for three dogs:
Wendy has recently tragically lost her husband and is not able to go back to the house they lived in.  She has 3 dogs that are currently being looked after at the house by a friend (she is not able to have them where she is currently staying).  Due to her not being able to see her situation stabilising in the next 6 months she has had no choice but to have her animals adopted as she cannot find a foster home for that long.  She says the dogs really don’t need to be homed together but it obviously would be preferable.

Nala – is a black Ridgeback, Labrador, bull mastiff cross (bitch) – Born October 2003 – she is 4 years old.   She has been sterilized and I will ensure her inoculations are up to date. 

Sheba – is a black & tan German shepherd (bitch) – February 2004 – 3.5 years old.  She has also been sterilized and innocs are up to date.

Gus – is a Rottweiler cross (not sure with what) male, he is around 18months/ 2years (need to check his book to confirm).  Sterilized and innocs will be up to date.

If anyone is able to help with having these doggies adopted please contact Wendy on (011) 453-5679 or 453-5697 / 083 327-5719 / wendy@visualthinking.co.za

Registered Bull Terrier needing a home:
Registered Bull Terrier needing to be homed by the 2nd Dec (parents are moving to Oz). Leo is a male, 2.5 years, inoculated.  Waiting to hear if sterilised.  If anyone could help please contact Hennie on 083 655 1891 or (011) 476 9598



On the twelfth day of Christmas my Labrador gave to me
A dozen Labbie kisses, and I forgot all about the other eleven days!!
 
 
© 2006 TTouch - eugenie@ttouch.co.za.   All Rights Reserved.
 

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