What is TTouch?Dogs/ Cats / Rabbits etc. - Companion AnimalsHorses - TTeamArticlesPractitionersWorkshopsResources
  home
contact us
site map

JOIN MAILING LIST  
  links newsletter photos testimonials fun & inspiration SHOP  
What is TTouch? Body Work Groundwork TTouch & Vets
Dogs Cats Birds Rabbits/ other Practitioner Training How to do the Touches
Horses - TTeam Playground of Higer Learning Practitioner Training
TTouch TTouch & Vets Puppies Clicker Training
What is Clicker Training Clicker for Shelters Articles Workshops
Practitioners in your Area How to Become a Practitioner Level Explanation
Complimentary Practitioners Products that help Healing Kennels & Catteries Pawtraits Where to buy Books & Products
DOGS      - Workshops      - Client Mornings      - Practitioner Training for
         Companion Animals
     - Lectures/Demos      - Clicker Training      - Puppy Classes CATS HORSES      - Workshops      - Practitioner Training      - Lectures/Demos/Client
         Mornings
HUMANS
 
        e-mail this page       print this page  
    ARTICLES - QUICK LINKS  
   
TTOUCH
TTOUCH & VETS
PUPPIES
CLICKER TRAINING
 
JOIN MAILING LIST
 YOU ARE HERE:
 ARTICLES > TTouch > TTouch Tips - Listening Hands – The Value Of Tellington TTouch – Part 3
 
  TTouch  Article:
  TTOUCH TIPS - LISTENING HANDS – THE VALUE OF TELLINGTON TTOUCH – PART 3
Article By: Marnie Black        Publish Date: 2006-05-01

(published in Seattle Purebred Rescue Magazine)

HOW TO DO TTOUCH
Following are simple TTouches and techniques that you can use any time on your animal.

All of these will help both the senior and the disabled animal. Twenty minutes at a sitting is the maximum amount of time to do TTouch on your dog. Beyond that time, the nervous system can be overtaxed, and the animal can become tired or restless. After a TTouch session animals often (but not always) drink more water and sleep deeply for an hour or two.

Lying Leopard

Excellent for excessive barking, nervousness, reducing stress, relaxation, wounds, bruising and swelling, and injuries. Rest your hand lightly on your dog’s body, your fingers flattened slightly to allow a large area of warm contact with fingers and palm. Go below the haircoat and push the skin one and a quarter circle. Make your circle last to a count of 5 or longer. Let your middle finger lead. Feel the connection between your forefinger and thumb, which are held several inches apart. Keep your wrist straight yet flexible. Breathing in rhythm with the circles you are doing helps maintain a softness in your fingers, hand, arm and shoulder. Assess your dog’s comfort level. If he seems uncomfortable, lighten the touch. Never press harder than you could tolerate on your own eyelid.

Python Lift

Excellent for arthritis, balancing, hip dysplasia, nervousness, gait improvement, improving physical and emotional balance, stiffness in back and shoulder. Place your hand on the body or around a leg with just enough pressure to gently lift the skin and muscle. Lift to a count of four or a full breath in, hold for a count of 2, and slowly lower the skin to a count of four or a full breath out. Be sure you are balanced and breathing. If you lift with tension in your own body, the animal will tense or move away.

Belly Lift

Excellent for arthritis, bloating, digestive problems, fear, fear of loud noises, sore back, shoulder or hips, stress and tension. Fold a towel so that it is 4 to 6 inches wide. Starting just behind your dog’s front legs, gently lift to a count of 4 or a full breath in. Do not lift so hard that you lift your dog off his feet. Hold for about 15 seconds. Release slowly, to a count of 8, or twice as long as it took to lift up. The slow release is essential to achieving the desired effect. After each lift move toward the hindquarters and repeat the procedure. Continue until you are all the way to the hindquarters. Repeat 3 or 4 times if your animal  tolerates it.

Bonding

We are all used to petting our dogs, but petting becomes unremarkable and somewhat mindless after a while. Even our dogs become habituated to petting and won’t be aware of the health benefits of your touch. Varying your hand movements as well as using different textures to touch your dog, will have your dog snuggling closer to you:

  • Use a chamois mitt from an auto store. Gently and slowly rub the mitt over your dog’s face, ears, back and paws. Always go in the same direction as his whiskers.
  • Use a paintbrush to outline the sworls and rivulets around your dog’s ears, chest and chin. Use a bigger paintbrush for his stomach and back.
  • Grasp a small handful of fur at the root. Gently move it in a circle and a quarter, and slowly let go while pulling over your index finger. Dogs especially love this on the top of their heads.
     

You will enjoy using TTouch as much as your dog does. TTouch affects you the same way it affects your animal. Many people use it while they are meditate or do their yoga exercises. Being mindful and enjoying the time you have with your animal is a gift you can give to both of you.

Marnie can be reached via her website at http://www.marnieblack.com/ 

THANKS MARNIE FOR SUCH A COMPREHENSIVE ARTICLE!

© 2006 TTouch - eugenie@ttouch.co.za.   All Rights Reserved.
 

Top